Seeking Professional Help: A Personal Journey

PazAt what point do you say to yourself, “I need help”? And how many times do you say it before you actually reach out? Do you wait to hang by a single thread? Or do you wait for that last thread to start tearing before someone else tells you to grab on for dear life because you’ll end up at the bottom, dead?

Well, we’ll all end up as putrid corpses. One day the braided threads of our lives, as we know them now, will unravel. But you get my drift. Continue reading

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When I Realised What I Do is Good

SailorThere are some things you may already vaguely know about me.  My real name is Carrie and I have an alternate personality whom I call Charlotte (not to mention the poor guy, Jack, in the back ground who hardly gets a say in anything).  I live in the UK near London, by the sea.  I am almost 30 years old.  I suffer from depression, I have recently been diagnosed with Emotional Dysregulation Disorder (the new name for BPD) and have lived with a host of psychiatric conditions since I was a child. 

I am also a Veterinary Nurse. Continue reading

Interactions with Mental Health Professionals

AngelThis topic stems from an idea that I had in relation to the post Be Your Own Advocate.

It’s something I occasionally allude to on my personal blog and in my comments on others’ blogs. Over the last two and a half years (has it really only been that long?), I’ve learned a lot about how to compose myself when discussing matters with other mental health professionals.

First, let’s go over my successive period of interactions with mental health professionals. Continue reading

Be Your Own Advocate

RubyAlwaysA Note From Ruby:  This post was written by Always and originally published 22 September 2011.  She has given me leave to post it again, now that our family (authors and readers both) has grown in size.  I think it’s a wonderful piece that absolutely everyone can learn from.

The title of this post doesn’t refer to joining groups whose purpose is to reduce the stigma of a mental health diagnosis, although that’s certainly a wonderful thing to do. Continue reading

Be Your Own Advocate

AlwaysThe title of this post doesn’t refer to joining groups whose purpose is to reduce the stigma of a mental health diagnosis, although that’s certainly a wonderful thing to do.  I’m also not referring to shouting about your mental health diagnoses from the rooftops, although God knows I all but will (I think if I literally did it, they would lock me up and I would further ingrain the stereotypes associated with manic-depression).  I’m talking about educating yourself, really learning about all things related to whatever your particular malady happens to be, psychiatric or even physical. Continue reading