One Of These Things Is Not Like The Others

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 This post contains discussion of chronic suicidal thinking. There are no actual suicides described or images.  Please read at your discretion.

 

Cate

Click to read Cate’s bio

I was sitting in the office of my Pain Management Specialist.  Also in the office was a medical student.  I know most people don’t like medical students sitting in on appointments, but I don’t mind.  They have to learn about the patient’s perspective somehow, and because in New Zealand their exposure to mental health, as part of their training, is so small, I think it’s vital that they get all the exposure they can get. Continue reading

Hello 2015

SSG

Click to read SSG’s bio

Yeah, yeah, I know it’s March already. But I was basically incomunicada. For more reasons than one.

But! I finally have internet at home!

So, I’m back…

Barely.

WordPress looks completely different. It took me a few moments to find my way back to Canvas from my personal blog.

For those of you not familiar with my saga, I am just emerging like a cicada, after three months of the most unreal and not believable crap you can ever think of. In Windsor, Ontario. Continue reading

Did You Know Momma is Depressed?

Click to read Jennifer's bio

Click to read Jennifer’s bio

The receptionist thought it would be a good idea to schedule my physical at the same time as my three daughters’.

Since you all have to come in anyway . . . she’d said.

In theory, yes.

In reality? Imagine keeping three ping-pong balls from smashing into each other or the four very close walls of the examination room and you are nearly there. Add a reflex hammer to the equation and you’ve just about got it. Continue reading

Toughing It Out

Cate

Click to read Cate’s bio

From where I was seated, it seemed that no one cried at my father’s funeral.   It seemed to me that it was stoicism all the way.  Most of them were pretty good at it.  My 12-year-old nephew was looking a bit shaky for a while, parents wondering whether he would ‘make it’ to be part of the party to walk the casket it out.  And I can tell you that I was definitely shaky.  I was all but crying, but everyone was so stone-faced that I was determined that I wouldn’t ‘fall apart’. Continue reading

Self worth

Sid

Click to read Sid’s bio

The good news is that I’m 46 years old, have a home, have a job, have two beautiful daughters, have the most wonderful fiancée, and have my whole life in front of me.

The bad news is that I’m 46 years old, live in a smallish flat only, have only a part-time job and no career, am not much of a father to my children, have repeatedly failed my wonderful fiancée, and have an entire life of further failure to endure.

Now there’s a glass half full/half empty scenario if there ever was one, right? Continue reading

Why I Disclosed My Mental Illness To My Employer

Cate

Click to read Cate’s bio

It’s a difficult one.  To disclose or not to disclose?  There are plenty of articles around about the issue of whether to tell your employer that you have a mental illness.  I came across a recent one and it got me thinking.  I disclosed in the past but would I do it again?

The article, Deciding Whether to Disclose Mental Disorders to the Boss by Alina Tugend (for The New York Times) got me thinking.  Has my mind changed?

You see, in 2009 I chose to tell my prospective employer that I had a mental illness. Continue reading

I’m Coming Home

click to read Lulu’s bio

“I’m Coming Home”

I cringed when I contemplated the time that elapsed between then and now. How long had I been gone? My hand cramped and froze while the cursor hovered over the hyperlink. I could easily determine that duration. But, what would that calculation amount to beyond the number?

In truth, I’ve written and rewritten this post infinitely in time and space. Whether it was one of dozens of drafts that exist tangibly in my documents folder, as a blurb in a journal entry, or on a note in a pile of obscure one liners. Or it was a flitter behind my eyelids as I fell asleep. Continue reading